Evolving cities; Tracing time

 

The Images and drawings above were produced over the last year or so. While the buildings are necessary structures to provide shelter there are so many more aspects to them that are expressive and revealing. Having arrived in London, the range and personality of every different structure is overwhelming, at first. But as London becomes familiar the rhythm of the skylines and streets are unique at every turn. Scale, period and style of extreme variations, have evolved in London’s long history. The culture of the city lies within its buildings and while there is more green space within the park lands per person than any other British City, the space is restricted. In particular, I am interested in the recycling of space, buildings are pulled down while others are protected and conserved. All buildings are man made and every one was once modern and of its day. So as the sprawl and rebuilding occurs daily, is the result an organic rejuvination? And can man compete with natural habitats as well as providing a fascinating backdrop of history. Structures now can offer little privacy, lights illuminate glass structures and every movement can be read from a distance. Are workers in the city the privilaged elite, looking out over the grounded population or are they confined, exposed and regulated? Increasingly buildings are made with reflective surfaces, with sky, light and other constructions rebounding, creating a merged, sometimes surreal scene. Also with Google investing in clouds of data what is the future in terms of space, architecture and communication? The artist Chris Orr’s work is fascinating, depicting the contemporary and traditional backdrops of London, Tokyo and New York. Another point of reference is the author Iain Sinclair and his book ‘London Orbital’ offering an in depth portrayal of the city.


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About Matthew Dale

Illustrator / Artist / Printmaker based in London, graduated from RCA in Communication Art and Design.
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